Celebrate Earth Day at the Nature Museum!

Date: Friday, April 22nd
Time: Predators & Prey program from 10:00am-11:30am; extended Museum hours until 1pm
Ages: All ages
Cost: By donation
Location: The Nature Museum

This beautiful planet deserves recognition each day, but we wouldn’t dream of missing an official opportunity to celebrate the big blue marble. Visit the museum on Friday, April 22 to enjoy a special soirée for youth and families in honor of Earth Day. The party kicks off at 10 a.m. with an hour-long indoor program titled “Predators and Prey” led by Environmental Educator Jamie Maloof-Schilling; outdoor games and a group hike will follow.

Maloof-Schilling will delve into the interplay between predators’ hunting prowess and the hustling quality of their prey, who have developed an impressive arsenal of skills to increase their chance of survival. Through stories, games, and touchable artifacts participants will learn how animals find a meal–or avoid being dinner. Party-goers will leverage their natural instincts while playing games that tap into their sense of sight, smell, sound, and touch. There will be plenty of interaction with fur, pelts, and bones to learn how carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores are connected. 

Afterwards, the group will head outdoors for a moderate hike and to play some games in the forest and fields surrounding the Nature Museum. The web of life will come alive at this Earth Day Party!

The Earth Day party runs from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; in addition, the Museum's natural history exhibits, educational mounts, and hands-on activities will be open to explore until 1 p.m. The program is open to all ages; admission is by donation. Walk-ins welcome, but an RSVP via the Nature Museum website, www.naturemuseum.org, is appreciated. 

Walk-ins welcome, but an RSVP letting us know that you plan to attend is always appreciated! 

About Jamie Maloof-Schilling

Jamie Maloof-Schilling taught at Kindle Farm School for ten years within the Wilderness Adventure Program, passing on a wide range of primitive skills to children ages 5-18. In addition to such skills as tracking, building fires, and first aid, she educated students on how to work together, and how to respect and enjoy the wilderness.

Maloof-Schilling also assisted in wilderness skills education at the Vermont Wilderness School’s Otter Day Camp and Oyase Summer Program. She conducts her own wilderness survival program, O.W.L.S.–“Outdoor, Wilderness, Learning, and Survival”, at area public schools, homeschool groups and various outdoor education organizations. She also leads herbal and edible medicinal workshops to various age groups.